Yolo: Things to do before you die

At+the+Georgia+Aquarium+kids+and+adults+look+at+a+Stingray+in+one+of+the+tanks.%0D%0Aphoto+credit%3A+flickr.com%0D%0Aphoto+by%3A+dublin+molly

At the Georgia Aquarium kids and adults look at a Stingray in one of the tanks. photo credit: flickr.com photo by: dublin molly

At the Georgia Aquarium kids and adults look at a Stingray in one of the tanks.
photo credit: flickr.com
photo by: dublin molly

All over the country there are tons of cities that have aquariums open to the public. Some of the best aquariums would be Texas State Aquarium, North Carolina Aquarium at Fort Fisher, Baltimore National Aquarium, Oregon Coast Aquarium, Monterey Bay Aquarium, The Florida Aquarium, Tennessee Aquarium and Georgia Aquarium.

The Georgia Aquarium is located in Atlanta is currently the largest aquarium in the world and one of the most stunning places tourists can visit in the United States.  It is home to tens of thousands of animals including 500 species around the world. The aquarium holds more than 10 million gallons of fresh and marine water, and also features more than 60 habitats making the visit a day filled of learning and exploring.

The largest exhibit displayed at the Georgia Aquarium measures 284 feet long and 126 feet wide. It is 30 feet deep at the maximum depth. It holds 6.3 million gallons of water and houses four whale sharks and four manta rays along with thousands of other animals.

People won’t want to miss the new dolphin gallery and show featuring an underwater dolphin viewing window and a musical theatrical performance. The performance highlights the emotional bond shared between dolphins and humans. AT&T Dolphin Tales is included with general admission to the aquarium.

The Georgia Aquarium is open 365 days a year. Ticket prices vary and are available online. Click below for more information on purchasing tickets.

One of the biggest reasons to visit is to see the aquarium’s whale sharks is because it’s the only institution outside of Asia to house this particular shark species.

http://www.georgiaaquarium.org/